Housing, Social and Human Services, Religious & Charitable Organizations, Planning & Support

CRITERIA FOR DESIGN
COMMUNITY INPUT

DEVELOPERS OFTEN COME TO OUR NEIGHBORHOOD COUNCIL WITH REQUESTS FOR:

1.    Support for a Variance, Exception or Modification to the regulations.

2.     Support for approval of a Conditional Use Permit or Zone Change

You will be notified through your Area chairs and the PLUM committee for projects on our agendas for discussion.  Please attend these meetings to share your concerns.

Each Area will have different priorities for issues of importance to their neighborhood. ¬†In an effort to represent community concerns, I have created a list of potential issues that we can encourage developers to address in their projects. ¬†While every one of these is important, knowing what is a priority to each neighborhood, will assist in developing a focus for requests.¬† ¬†Please take a moment to copy and fill out your top five issues (1 being most important, 5 being least) and email to [email protected]
http://www.hhwnc.org/files/CRITERIA%20FOR%20DESIGN.pdf
CHARACTER OF NEIGHBORHOODS:    AREA ______________________________

Priority ISSUE
Walkable streets (Trees, setbacks, parking, widened sidewalks)
Scale: Height transitions ( transitional heights can prevent a wall on the property line by steping back one or two stories)
Massing (recessed elements: bringing building elements like doorways, windows or balconies in front of or behind the building plane, breaks up a mass to create more interest.)
Density: # of units allowed  (density bonuses are common requests and allow more units and more square feet to be allowed on a specific lot)
Renters versus owners – ¬†Apts or condos: ¬†(Currently “small lot sub-divisions” are being proposed on lots that might have otherwise been apartment buildings.)
Privacy ( balconies and building heights: balconies that project from the face of a building and tall buildings in residential zones may effect the privacy of the adjacent property owner.)
Landscape (sustainable elements, traffic calming: landscaped buffer zones in both commercial and residential area)
Fencing and gates (heights/ setbacks)
Parking (street/ on property)
Safety ( Street lights)
Noise (events/ commercial activity)
Conservation (preservation of historic resources)
Design (Anything goes or style fits into neighborhood)
Open public space (parks, courtyards, plazas, paseos)
Signage (proportional to the size of the project)
Bicycle lanes
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